Tagged: kcp testimonials

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What the KCP Means to Me:

Pricila | San Francisco, California

Snoopy Readingfavicon When I first started using my Kindle I was in the 9th grade. I thought reading was the worst thing in the world. I kept telling myself that reading was just a waste of time and that it was boring. Whenever I had to read, I would think about it too much, and in the end, I wouldn’t read anything.

Last year when my 9th grade Reading Lab teacher, Ms. Spitz, told us we had to choose a book to read, I thought, This class is going to be the most boring class of all.

But the reality was different. The book I chose was the first book I have ever really enjoyed reading.

Then, two weeks later, I got my Kindle. My best friend and I were really excited about getting Kindles. I read more than 10 books on my Kindle. I read all the books that Simone Elkeles has written and nine books by other authors.

I’m really happy and proud of all the books I’ve read and what I’ve accomplished over the past school year and the summer. I kept my book during the summer and finished two books. I would have read more, but I was busy most of my summer.

Thanks to the Kindle Classroom Project, my interest for reading has grown a lot over the years. I’ve found so many good book in the Kindle Library. In the Kindle Library, there is a huge variety of books—books of all types of genres. I would like to thank Ms. Spitz and the KCP for the opportunity to read on a Kindle. Thank you! favicon

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What the KCP Means to Me:

Bryant | Oakland, California

7c363d8e3c966597f90311d14d81d236favicon If I had to identify the exact point in time when I started to actually like reading, I’d say it was somewhere around fifth grade, when my rather annoying 10-year-old self discovered the magic of Harry Potter. (Ha, see what I did there? Magic. Get it? It’s funny.)

Though I was obviously far too young to really appreciate the nuances of J.K. Rowling’s writing, I enjoyed it nonetheless: I loved Harry, I loved the Wizarding World, I loved how the adults in Harry’s life thought repeatedly sending a minor into life-threatening danger would be a good idea.

After that, being the little ambitious fifth grader prone to delusions of grandeur I was, I decided to set out and prove to the world that I was the most avid reader ever. When that aspiration crashed and burned just like every other dream I’ve ever had in my life, I decided to lower my expectations and settle for just being an avid reader.

Because I file everything not strictly related to academics into the “more or less useless” information part of my mind at the end of every school year, I can’t tell you exactly what impressions the books I read in middle school left on me, but my fondness for reading grew at about the same rate the acne of my classmates’ faces did during those days.

After hearing that more or less useless account of my reading history, I think I can safely say how pleased I am to be part of the Kindle Classroom Project without sounding like I’m only saying it because I’m obligated to do so (which I am) and being insincere with my words (which I’m not).

I’m antisocial and introverted, and no love of reading can fix that, so I don’t particularly enjoy having to go to the library. I don’t like having to awkwardly stand there while a librarian checks out my books and silently judges me on my selection. Now, with the Kindle Classroom Project, I don’t have to!

While I’m not one of those kids from the part of my generation who have trouble returning pencils they borrow (at least, I don’t think I am), I somehow still feel much more at ease having a Kindle on hand instead instead of, say, 732 physical copies of all the books in the KCP library. It’s much more convenient and easier for me now to make use of and appreciate my literacy with the Kindle.

If I feel like reading a book, I can just click on the title and wait a minute or so for it to download. If all the digital copies of the book are checked out, I can simply request another copy online instead of being put on some library waiting list, which, granted, only happened to me once at the Oakland Public Library, but the waiting list was 40 people long and made the task of finishing my summer reading list more cumbersome.

If I feel like reading into the wee hours of the night because I didn’t feel like I read enough during the day, I don’t need to turn on the light to see what I’m reading; the Kindle is the light! Of course, reading in the dark while staring at an LCD screen isn’t the best way to take care of your eyes, too, but I already wear glasses, so the worst thing that can happen to me from reading a Kindle at night is eye fatigue.

Because of the KCP, my love for reading has flourished and ignited in ways I never thought it was capable of before. Why, just a few months ago, I decided to read Pride and Prejudice on my Kindle just for the hell of it. Yes, I may not have understood half of the book, but I would have never even considered checking out a physical copy from the library. If my growing passion for reading was a fire, then I guess you could say my Kindle was… kindling for that flame. (See what I did there? Again, nothing? Come on, it’s funny.) favicon

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What the KCP Means to Me:

Laurin | Oakland, California

Laurin-KCPfavicon I have had my Kindle for about 2 months and I love it. At the beginning, you don’t know what to read because there’s so much to choose from. Choosing just one book seems impossible — well, it was for me!

I love the Kindle program because it allows you the opportunity to choose among hundreds of books, books that you probably wouldn’t be able to read because you can’t afford them or you can’t find. The KCP is a great opportunity to read a variety of books, from romance to comedy. Any genre you want to read, the Kindle has it.

I really have enjoyed my Kindle, I have been reading series over series since I got my Kindle. My reading speed has increased because of how I have being reading over this month. I have cried, laughed, and even gotten mad when I read, and that is because reading has become such a constant thing that I read many books with different plots. Each plot extends my imagination and allows me to grow as a reader.

I recommend the Kindle to everyone. It’s such a great device. You just get so much enjoyment from just one tiny little thing. Because of the Kindle, my passion for reading has returned, and I am more eager than ever to read as many books as possible in one day. By far the Kindle program is AMAZING. Everyone should try it! favicon

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What the KCP Means to Me:

Grace | Oakland, California

facebook-picturefavicon I’m really glad I get to be a part of the Kindle Classroom Project! When I first heard about the Kindle Classroom Project, I thought it was an awesome idea that would give students opportunities to read throughout the school year and would offer easier access to books for students who do not have the time to check out books at libraries.

As a student, and especially as a senior, I am always busy. I have to juggle work while balancing my busy schedule at school and outside of it. However, I enjoy those precious moments where I can kick back, relax, and read on my Kindle.

During Spring Break, I was surprised how much of a bookworm I’ve become. I’ve been reading so many interesting books (such as Legend and The Young Elites by Marie Lu). I’ve been a huge bookworm in the past, but I’ve never really had time to read because I was preoccupied with other stuff. It would also be a hassle to go to the library and borrow books.

My Kindle, however, feels like a mini-library that I can carry around anytime: in my backpack, my purse, or in my hand. There is a huge library full of books to choose from within my Kindle, and I’ve discovered so many interesting books to read!

Thanks to the Kindle Classroom Project, I have rediscovered my joy of reading! I thank the supporters and teachers who have made the Kindle Classroom Project possible! Thank you for your support! favicon

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What the KCP Means to Me:

Lara Trale | Oakland, California

KCP-Lara-Tralefavicon When I learned to love to read, I was a messy and indiscriminate reader: I read anything I could, including tons of crap, and I read it recklessly. I destroyed books–ripped in my rush for the next page, jammed through the sharp teeth of a stuck-zippered backpack, milk-stained from breakfast, and, too often, lost under my bed, sometimes for so long that the story, when finally rediscovered, felt eerily like a long-forgotten dream.

Did you know the Oakland Public Library has a limit to how many books you can have out at once? It’s 40. As a kid, I hit that limit every summer.

I am not trying to write about me, not really, but I think my history’s important here. I, like many of my students, was an exemplary childhood reader. This is no surprise; like most avid readers, I grew up around people who loved to read, who read to me and surrounded me with books. That’s kind of all it takes.

I’m trying to write, though, about the students who don’t like to read, and it’s by looking at strong readers’ histories that I can see what they need: They need a community of readers. They need to see and hear other people taking joy in books. And they need lots and lots of books to read. (And this is tricky, because here’s the thing about teaching emerging readers: You’re going to lose a lot of books.)

The Kindle Classroom Project helps with all of this. The sleek black devices are visible signals that my room is filling with people who care to read, whose book choices are more or less no one else’s business, and who exert constant pressure on one another through the clandestine sharing of the scandalous or infuriating or beautiful passages they’re reading. For my Post Generation reluctant readers, a Kindle’s electronic interface offers the comfortable reassurance of a security blanket. Reading on a screen doesn’t scare them. They try it. And more and more, they’re learning to like it. favicon

Ed. Note: Lara is a KCP teacher in Oakland.

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What the KCP Means to Me:

Susan Scott | Tacoma, Washington

Stock-KindleI used to have piles of books all over the house that I didn’t have room on bookshelves for and hadn’t gotten around to reading yet. With my Kindle, my “piles” of books still exist, but at least they no longer take up space!

That’s why I was so thrilled to hear about the Kindle Classroom Project. Reading has been so important to me ever since I was a kid. I get to “experience” other places, learn about different viewpoints, and expand my knowledge of things I’m interested in. I’m delighted to be able to contribute to other kids being able to have access to the same things!

Ed. Note: Thank you, Susan, for writing this testimonial! Also, Susan is challenging four more KCP supporters (now 3 — thanks, Brian!) to donate $50 each to take advantage of Amazon’s current deal on the Kindle Fire. Let me know if you’re interested!