Tagged: donations

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Megabook Initiative donates 36 Kindles!

favicon I thought Karen-Alexandra Nogues was donating one Kindle when she completed the Donate Kindle form last week. It turns out that Ms. Nogues, founder and executive director of Megabook Initiative, intended on donating 36 Kindles!

Thank you very much for this wonderful and generous donation.

Megabook Initiative believes that today’s readers are tomorrow’s leaders. The program distributes devices to children in places where access to books is limited, including Ivory Coast and Togo. Ms. Nogues understands the importance of reading and found the Kindle Classroom Project through its partnership with Worldreader.

Here’s an interview with Ms. Nogues about Megabook Initiative. It’s a few years old, when Ms. Nogues was a senior in high school. Now she attends Harvard University and will graduate next year.

I’m impressed with Ms. Nogues, her commitment to young people, and her ability to explain clearly the importance of reading. We believe in many of the same things!

I look forward to getting these 36 Kindles ready for students in Oakland and San Francisco. Maybe they’ll go to ninth grade teacher Shannon, who maintains a robust physical classroom library and is ready for a Kindle pilot. favicon

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Worldreader donates 458 Kindle Keyboards! This is the largest donation in KCP history.

favicon I am very happy to announce that Worldreader, a powerhouse nonprofit that spreads literacy in developing countries in order to create a world where everyone is a reader, has donated 458 Kindle Keyboards to the Kindle Classroom Project.

That’s not a typo: 458 is the correct number.

Thank you, Worldreader!

Um, that’s a lot of Kindles. In fact, this donation is the biggest in KCP history, more than double the 2015 gift of 210 Kindles from an anonymous supporter.

Here’s just one box of the massive donation (there are about 100 Kindles here):

And here are the rest of the 458 Kindles, plus hordes of cases and sleeves and chargers, in the back of my Honda Fit.

I’m blown away by the enormity of this donation and by the generosity of Worldreader. It is a transformative gift for the Kindle Classroom Project.

  • It increases the number of Kindles in the KCP by 50 percent (from 918 to 1,376),
  • It means that an entire new school can join the KCP,
  • It pushes my thinking about the next steps of the KCP.

Even more impressive than the massive gift was the kindness of the Worldreader staff throughout the donation process. One day last month on LinkedIn I received a message from Zev Lowe, senior director at Worldreader. Could the KCP use some Kindles? he asked. And would you like to come by to speak to the team? Sure!

It was wonderful to meet the Worldreader staff, get a tour of its San Francisco operations (thank you, Ryan Lew), meet founder David Risher, and answer questions about the KCP. (We opted for an informal Q and A session, rather than a formal presentation, though I did come with some slides — see below!) Everyone was kind, smart, and like-minded. Their commitment to promoting reading among young people in the developing world is unparalleled, and they were impressed with the KCP community of students, teachers and supporters.

Since my visit, I’ve spent a lot of time charging Kindles, getting ready for the Winter Kindle Party (it’s on Jan. 22, want to come? please sign up here!), and staying in touch with Worldreader. Everyone continues to be kind and helpful. For example, content director Danielle Zacarias volunteered her time to share her deep knowledge about publishers and digital book distribution, which was invaluable. Thank you!

I’ll keep you posted on what happens with this colossal donation — how I prep them for students, which teachers and students get them, and what it all means for the KCP. If you have questions, please leave them in the comments. Thank you again, Worldreader! favicon

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A huge year for the Kindle Classroom Project!

Note: This post was originally published yesterday in this month’s newsletter. Consider subscribing!

favicon Happy December! Hope your holiday is going well so far! It has been a long time since my last update, and since then, there have been huge changes to the Kindle Classroom Project. Check out these highlights!

The KCP smashes the 1,000-Kindle barrier!
Kindle donations have been astounding this year. Back in February, there were 688 Kindles. Now there are 1,376. (Yep, that’s double the number.) How is this possible? Two ways:

1. Generous supporters have sent in Kindles at around 1 per day.
Donors since February include: Anne (Seattle, WA), Mark (Kensington, CA), Mark (Bethesda, MD), Paula (Brooklyn, NY), Stacey (Danville, CA), Michelle (San Francisco, CA), Barbara (Encinitas, CA), Jay (Odenton, MD), Brian (Leesburg, VA), Uketa (Columbus, GA), Thao (Daly City, CA), Cherie (Burlington, ON), Arran (Denver, CO), John (Schererville, IN), Tom & Rob (San Francisco, CA), Wendy (Nashville, TN), James (Willington, CT), Robert (Dix Hills, NY), Melisa (West Bend, WI), Anjum (Brooklyn, NY), Vicky (New York, NY), Raymond (Philadelphia, PA), Amy (Atlanta, GA), Sharath (Charlotte, NC), Sharon (Natchez, MS), Michael (Cupertino, CA), Kerry (Marina, CA), Paul (Berkeley, CA), Anna (Calgary, AB), Samantha (Beacon, NY), Darrell (Lodi, CA), Dezmond (Seattle, WA), Adams Brothers (Atlanta, GA), Angela (San Mateo, CA), Caren (Camp Springs, MD), Sarah (Austin, TX), Paul (Manakin-Sabot, VA), Mario (Alexandria, VA), Emily (San Francisco, CA), Michael (Patchogue, NY), Peter (Santa Clara, CA), Daniel (New York, NY), Wendy (Sandy, OR), Sandra (Houston, TX), Ann (Los Altos, CA), Elizabeth (Byron, MN), Kay (Ballston Lake, NY), Joanne (Indianapolis, IN), Diane (Sammamish, WA), Sarah (Lake Oswego, OR), John (Boulder, CO), Rob (Villanova, PA), Herb (Morehead City, NC), Terry (Etiwanda, CA), JonAngelo (Twain Harte, CA), Cathy (Lodi, CA), Janice (El Cerrito, CA), Patrick (Norwood, MA), Brad & Ellen (Okemos, MI), Britt (Philadelphia, PA), Russ (Lees Summit, MO), Christine (Lilburn GA), Pete (N. Olmsted, OH), Mark (Pompano Beach, FL), Sarah (Seattle, WA), Christina (Huntington Station, NY), Sarah (North Royalton, OH), Christine (Somerville, MA), Linda (Roseville, CA), Kate (Dayton, ME), Peter (San Francisco, CA), Eleanor (Bellevue, WA), Christine (Herndon, VA), Sandra (Dallas, TX), Rosalie (Melrose Park, IL), Mary (Blooming Grove, TX), Mark (La Jolla, CA), Gay (Flemington, NJ), Christine (Olympia, WA), Lynnette (Los Angeles, CA), Andy (St. Louis, MO), Cissy (Plymouth, MA), Nealy (San Francisco, CA), Reginald (Houston, TX), Patricia (Irving, TX), Elizabeth (Seattle, WA), Bonnie (Charleston, SC), Marcia (Englewood, CO), Cassandra (Balwyn, AUS), Karla (Sherman Oaks, CA), Juliana (Harrisburg, PA), John (San Mateo, CA), Alan (Encinitas, CA), Pam (Midland, TX), Darlene & Hugh (Woodcliff Lake, NJ), Allison (Jacksonville, FL), Yvonne (Kissimmee, FL), Kristin (Seattle, WA), Olimpia (Salem, SC), Robert (Sun City, AZ), Sharon (Algonac, MI), Teresa (W. Orange, NJ), Jennifer (Ackworth, GA), Elizabeth (Morro Bay, CA), Kerry (Marina Del Rey, CA), Marc (Brooklyn, NY), Andras (Concord, NC), Marie & Eddie (Bangor, ME), Kristin (Hayward, CA), Susan (Arlington, VA), Aaron (Albuquerque, NM), Diane (Calgary, AB), Kristi (Ramona, CA), Leigh (Seligman, MO), Sheila (Berkeley, CA), Allie (Orange, CA), Jacki (Edgewater, MD), Charlene (Englewood, CO), Shari (San Francisco, CA), Kate (Newburyport, MA), Sam (North Potomac, MD), Joey (Parkville, MD), Pam (Stamford, CT), Simona (Altamante Springs, FL), Chris (Montgomery Vlg, MD), The Pelletiers (N. Tonawanda, NY), Matt (Ladera RAnch, CA), Robert (Ossining, NY), Anthony (New York, NY), Jamie (Oakland, CA), Betsy (Seattle, WA), Susan (Mtn. View, CA), Nathaniel (Brooklyn, NY), Francis (San Francisco, CA), Heather (Bozeman, MT), Jodell (Skaneateles, NY), Robin (Bronx, NY), Alissa (Waterford, VA), Karen (Highland Vlg, TX), Jim (Buffalo, NY), Michele (San Francisco, CA), Christian (Kirkland, WA), Joe (Seattle, WA), Joe (Seattle, WA), YT (San Diego, CA), Robyn (Redmond, WA), Janet (San Jose, CA), Daniel (Ben Lomond, CA), Jay (Odenton, MD), Blaiz (Los Angeles, CA), Brad & Ellen (Okemos, MI), Matthew (San Francisco, CA), Jeff (Placentia, CA), Megan (Lincoln, CA), Jocelyn (San Francisco, CA), Greg (Irvine, CA), Amy (Brooklyn, NY), Miriam (Davis, CA), Shannon (Boise, ID), Carson (Newburyport, MA), Ma’Lanee (Bear, DE), David (Chevy Chase, MD), Oliver (Houston, TX), and Iris (Avon, CT). THANK YOU!

Have another Kindle to donate? Or a friend who might like to donate one? Here’s how.

2. Worldreader made a huge donation of 458 Kindles to the KCP. (Wow.)
Worldreader is a wonderful non-profit organization whose mission is to eradicate illiteracy, “to create a world where everyone is a reader.” Last month, I got a message from Zev Lowe, senior director at Worldreader. Could the KCP use some Kindles? And would you like to come by to speak to the team? Sure!

It was wonderful to meet the Worldreader staff, get a tour of operations (thank you, Ryan Lew), meet founder David Risher, and answer questions about the KCP. (Here are some neat slides!) Everyone was kind, smart, and like-minded. Their commitment to promoting reading among young people in the developing world is unparalleled, and they were impressed with the KCP community of students, teachers, and supporters.

Zev’s promise of “some” Kindles ended up becoming this behemoth donation (458 Kindles, 400+ cases, 400+ chargers, and more). Take a look!

This donation from Worldreader is the largest in KCP history. It allows the program to serve more students and teachers in more schools. In addition, I look forward to keeping in touch with Worldreader to find ways that both projects can deepen our impact.

The KCP now serves a whole school!
It was always a dream of mine to see the Kindle Classroom Project grow to serve an entire school. That dream is now a reality! Since August, all 425 students at Envision Academy in Oakland have been reading on Kindles. They have 25 minutes of independent reading time every day, plus nearly all students take their Kindles home. This means students read at night, on weekends, and over vacation breaks.

Every Friday, I get to visit Envision Academy, and inevitably, students stop me in the halls and staircases, asking me for new books, telling me about their favorites, and thanking me for their Kindles. Sometimes they call me Mr. Mark, and other times, they refer to me as The Kindle Guy, and either way, it is heartwarming.

The KCP Library is booming
Because of generous donors and student enthusiasm, the KCP Library now stands at 925 books (up from 669 in February). The library keeps growing and growing! One motto of the program is that students may read what they like, when they like, however much they like. As a result, students get to request new titles that interest them, and students choose well.

Here are some of the books students have requested over the past few weeks:

         

Students choose good books. They request their books on the program website, any time day and night, and I buy them within a few hours. There is a trust building among students that the KCP community cares deeply about their reading interests and will honor student book requests.

I’d like to thank the following people for donating to build the KCP Library in 2016: Lori (Oceanside, CA), Jamie (Oakland, CA), Brian (Leesburg, VA), Becky (Woodside, NY), Stuart (New York, NY), Iris (San Diego, CA), DSW (Saratoga, CA), Chris (Montgomery Village, MD), Toni (Apex, NC), Ma’Lanee (Bear, DE), Sharon (Naperville, IL), Elder Family Foundation (Berkeley, CA), Sherril (Pacifica, CA), Dina (Saratoga, CA), Patrick (Garfield, NJ), Barbara (Oakland, CA), Pat (Santa Rosa, CA), Michelle (Alameda, CA), Tom & Rob (San Francisco, CA), Karl & Phoebe (Santa Cruz, CA), Allie (Orange, CA), Bob (New York, NY), and Kati (Newark, CA). Thank you! (Hope I didn’t miss anyone!)

Want to help build the KCP Library? Here’s how!

Sustaining donors ensure the KCP’s long-term health
Whenever I get nervous that I won’t be able to honor a student’s book request, another KCP supporter chooses to donate again, or to make a sustaining donation. It is a testament to the power of the KCP community that so many people continue to give and give. KCP supporters believe in young people and their reading lives.

Here are the KCP’s sustaining donors of 2016: Brian (Leesburg, VA), DSW (Saratoga, CA), Iris (San Diego, CA), Sherril (Pacifica, CA), Barbara (Oakland, CA), Pat (Garfield, NJ), Dina (Saratoga, CA), Stuart (New York, NY), Toni (Apex, NC), Lori (Oceanside, CA), Sam (North Potomac, MD), Matthew (San Francisco, CA), Irene (Los Altos, CA), Cathy (Lodi, CA), Susan (Mtn. View, CA), Emily (San Francisco, CA), Kati (Newark, CA), Amy (Brooklyn, NY), Kate (Dayton, ME), Bob (New York, NY), Jamie (Oakland, CA), Pat (Santa Rosa, CA), Elder Family Foundation (Berkeley, CA), Laura (San Francisco, CA), Chris (Montgomery Vlg, MD). Thank you! (Hope I didn’t miss anyone!)

In all, $9,148 has been donated so far in 2016, 22% more than the $7,525 donated last year. Thank you! Want to become a sustaining supporter of the KCP? Here’s how!

Next steps for the KCP
So much, so many things! I’m excited about a number of projects, including:

Finding another school that would like to go all-KCP. There are a few excellent candidates, including ARISE High School, Oakland High School, Elmhurst Community Prep (all in Oakland), Leadership High School, and City Arts and Technology High School (both in San Francisco). We would pilot in the Spring semester and then launch whole-school next August.

– Maybe expanding to middle schools. Research says that independent reading declines beginning in fifth grade, especially for boys. If the KCP can encourage young people to read beginning in middle school, they’ll never have to reclaim their love of reading; it’ll always be there! One challenge: Introducing middle schools would require starting a new KCP library from scratch to accommodate what’s appropriate for younger readers.

– Nonprofit 501c3? It’s always in the back (or front!) of my mind to quit my day job, take a risk, and make the Kindle Classroom Project a nonprofit organization. But legal and financial considerations (particularly with book distribution) make it challenging. My hope is to build a pilot program in 2017 that will test whether a 501c3 is viable. This “test KCP classroom” might be one that I lead myself! (More to come about that.)

Thank you again for all your support. We have built a very strong community. If you’d like to help out some more, please let me know! favicon

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Give a student a reading allowance!

KCP-at-CATfavicon Did you get an allowance growing up?

I didn’t. Maybe I wasn’t consistent on chores. Or maybe my parents gave me everything I needed. (Probably both were true.)

Some of my friends got allowances, though, which they spent on luxuries, like baseball cards, chocolate malts from the school cafeteria, and books.

Last week, I challenged KCP supporters to become sustaining donors. With the program expanding quickly (now 800 students and 19 teachers!), and with Kindles streaming in (170 so far in 2016!), students are requesting books left and right (777 and counting), and I’d like to keep the program’s promise that they can read whatever they like, whenever they like.

Wouldn’t it be great if you could give a student a reading allowance?

The other day, I learned about Amazon Allowance through loyal KCP supporter Brian (Leesburg, VA). The program lets you send an automatic, recurring digital gift card to another Amazon account. It hit me: This could be perfect for KCP donors who want to make regular contributions.

 

amazonallowance2

The process is easy. You go to the Amazon Allowance page, then click through to your Amazon account. Then you fill out a quick form, where you get to title the allowance (include your name here!), choose who gets the allowance (kindleclassroomproject AT gmail DOT com), how much to donate (minimum is $5) and how often (every month, every other week, every week, daily, or one-time). Finally, you choose your credit card, and you’re done. (Don’t worry: You can stop your allowance at any time.)

I made a screencast to help you. I think you’ll enjoy it. It lasts 2:19.

The biggest reason I like Amazon Allowance is that 100% of your donation goes to the KCP, whereas PayPal takes a 3% fee.

The other reason is that if you choose to donate, you are saying, “Yes, Mark. I am totally in, and I want to promote reading, and I believe in what the KCP is doing, and I want the program to be sustainable for many years to come.”

(By the way, you’re also saying: “And please don’t bother me as often with requests for one-time donations, because I’m already donating.”)

Please consider giving an Amazon allowance to a lucky student. I’m happy to report that there are already 10 sustaining donors for a total of $160 a month: Brian (Leesburg, VA), DSW (Saratoga, CA), Barbara (Oakland, CA), Stuart (New York, NY), Lori (Oceanside, CA), Iris (San Diego, CA), Toni (Cary, NC), Nicole (Quincy, MA), Patrick (Garfield, NJ), and an Anonymous Donor. Wouldn’t you like to join this illustrious group?

I’ll update this post as new generous people sign up. Please let me know if you have questions! One more thing: If you’d like to get the word out, you can share this post with the URL j.mp/kcpallowancepost and the video with the URL j.mp/kcpallowancehowto. Thank you! favicon

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Promote reading. Become a monthly donor.

10th grader at Envision Academy, Oakland, CA.
11th grader at Envision Academy, Oakland, CA.

favicon The past four years, more than 450 generous people from across the country have donated Kindles to promote the joy of reading among urban high school students in the San Francisco Bay Area. Thank you!

The Kindles keep coming (34 so far this month), and the program continues to expand (3 new classrooms so far this month). The growth is uplifting and heartwarming!

By the end of January, the KCP will serve 650 students and 14 teachers in 5 schools. Students get 24-hour-a-day access to a Kindle and 640+ books (and counting).

Update 12/2016: The KCP now serves more than 900 students and 29 teachers. There have been 1,376 Kindles donated in all!

All of the books in the KCP Library come from student requests. This means these are books that students want to read. Here are some examples of recent requests:

  • All American Boys, by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely
  • Wild Crush, by Simone Elkeles
  • Kaffir Boy, by Mark Mathabane
  • The Food Lab, by J. Kenji López-Alt
  • The Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson
  • Patternmaster, by Octavia E. Butler

When they get choice, students choose well. That’s why I tell students that I will honor their book requests. By doing so, I’m telling them that their interests are important, their reading lives are important — their hearts and minds are important.

I would like to encourage you to promote reading by making a monthly donation to the Kindle Classroom Project. Your contribution will directly fund students’ book requests.

Each book you fund goes on the student’s Kindle as well as in the KCP Library. Up to six students can read a book at the same time. Kindle ebooks never get lost or worn. Your investment will last for many years to come.

If you’re interested in becoming a monthly donor, choose one of the following levels:

  • Book Lover: $5 a month (a book every two months) ($60 a year)
  • Bibliophile: $10 a month (a book a month) ($120 a year)
  • Bibliomaniac: $20 a month (two books a month) ($240 a year)
  • Bookworm: $40 a month (four books a month) ($480 a year)

Choose your level below and then click “Donate Now,” which will take you to PayPal to complete your donation. Afterward, I’ll send you an email to thank you! Remember that you may stop your monthly donations at any time.


Promote reading: Become a sustaining donor of the Kindle Classroom Project!


I can’t wait to see how many of you take the plunge and make a monthly contribution. KCP students and teachers will be very grateful, as will I! If you have any questions, please let me know — whether by leaving a comment or by sending an email. Thank you.

Update: You can also make a recurring donation through Amazon Allowance. The benefit is that 100% of your donation goes to the KCP! The Amazon account to donate to is kindleclassroomproject AT gmail DOT com. favicon

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More evidence that Kindle donors are great

favicon Kindle donors are not just generous. They’re also creative and conscientious. You can tell in the packaging.

Today, Kindle #513 came, a Kindle Fire from Jules in Portland, Oregon. Thank you, Jules!

Here’s the outside of the package. Note the drawing.

Kindle Outside Package

And here’s the inside of the package. Yep, it’s another padded envelope, just in case, plus another note.

Kindle Inside Package

And take a look at the little notebook that Jules included. Though I want to keep this notebook, I’ll be giving it to the student who gets Jules’s Kindle.

IMG_20150422_201355481

The extra touches are perfect. I can’t wait to give this Kindle away to a student. He or she will hear about Jules from Portland who packages her Kindle safely and securely and who really cares about the student’s reading life.

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210 Kindle Fires arrive in largest donation ever

favicon Just a few days ago, I announced that the Kindle Classroom Project had reached 300 Kindles. There was fanfare and jubilation. It was big.

Today is even bigger. Huge, in fact. Perhaps enormous.

A donor (who asked not to be named) has contributed 210 Kindle Fire HDX 7s to the program. There are now 511 Kindles in all.

The cash value of the donation is more than $35,000.

This is what the 210 Kindles look like inside my (new) car:

210 Kindles in Car

In each of those boxes, there are six Kindle Fire HDX 7s. If you open up one of the boxes, this is what you get inside.

6 Kindles in a Box

Keep opening and opening, and you get a beautiful reading tablet. (I’m checking out a sample of The Girl on The Train, which is getting good reviews.)

Kindle Fire HDX 7

I think, at this point, I’m pretty much speechless. Maybe I’ll have better words in a few days to explain more clearly what has just happened.

But here are a few first attempts:

1. Thank you. Thank you to the wonderful donor, and thank you to the good friend who connected the donor with me.

2. The Kindle Classroom Project is no longer a cute little program. I’m not sure what it is yet, but it’s at least a medium-sized program now.

3. Tablets are different from e-readers. Their additional features push me to think more broadly about next steps. One possibility is to look into audiobooks, particularly for students who have dyslexia or may benefit from professional narration (in addition to reading the text).

Now it’s time to get these Kindles in front of students as soon as possible. To make that happen, there is a ton of work to do. But I can’t wait! favicon

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Students do not lose Kindles

favicon The other day I tweeted:

Here’s the data: In the 3+ years of the Kindle Classroom Project, students have lost zero Kindles.

Let’s break it down further. There are 260 Kindles, each having access to 423 books. That’s a Kindle Library that virtually contains 109,980 books.

In the 3+ years of the KCP, students have lost zero books.

Kindle Library

It’s mind-boggling, actually, especially if you ask a teacher who has spent years building an independent reading program. So much effort goes into building a classroom library, monitoring book check-in and check-out, exhorting students to return books, feeling sad when books get lost, and spending money replacing books rather than purchasing new ones that students have requested.

Of course, I may be jinxing myself when I write this, but here goes:

1. When a generous person donates his or her Kindle, the Kindle won’t get lost.
2. When a generous person donates money for books, the books won’t get lost.

 




 

It’s as simple as that, and that simplicity makes me very happy. favicon

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3 months, 92 Kindles

favicon More Kindles have been donated in the last three months than in any other similar stretch in the history of the Kindle Classroom Project.

Since Nov. 1, 92 Kindles have arrived at the KCP. That’s one a day!

Please take a look at this chart:chart_1

 

It’s normal to have a holiday jump. Amazon usually comes out with a new Kindle model before Thanksgiving, which people buy for themselves or their loved ones. This means that generous people look for good homes for their used devices. Last year, 56 Kindles were donated between from November through January. But 92 is most the KCP has ever received by far.

Getting so many Kindles has been really fun, and I’m getting better at processing them quickly and getting them ready for students. Because the volume is so high, I hope to open another Kindle classroom in the next few weeks.

Again, I’d like to thank all the generous people who donate their Kindles, contribute money for books, and leave kind messages of support for the Kindle Classroom Project. Although the program is still small, it’s becoming something, and I’m hopeful to see it grow. favicon

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SF students give thanks for Kindles

favicon The Kindles have been in Kathleen’s classroom in San Francisco for less than two weeks, and already, students are writing thank-you cards.

Here are a few! (The first two didn’t photograph well.)

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“Thanks so much for the Kindles, Mr. Isero! You’ve opened me up to so many books. I am currently reading The ShallowsThe Alchemist, and The New York Times. Thanks! –Nick

IMG_20150114_202722458

“Dear Mr. Isero, Thank you very much for the Kindles. I am excited to read Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights. The Kindles will come in handy! —Sincerely, Eryka Q.

IMG_20150114_202739666

“Dear Mr. Isero, Thank you so much for the Kindles! They have opened the doors even wider into the world of reading. You are so kind for donating all of these Kindles to us juniors! Because of this Kindle, I will never lose my interest in reading.” —Sincerely, M.C.

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“Dear Mr. Isero, I am very happy to know that someone like you takes pride in helping young adults. I would like to appreciate and thank you for the Kindles. They make reading so much better! I am reading The Cartel series, and I’m on Book 5, thanks to the Kindle. Thank you so much!” —Jada

* * *
I think these are wonderful — it’s great to get thanks. But really, the gratitude goes to the hundreds of people from across the country who have found the Kindle Classroom Project and donated their Kindles. (And to Kathleen, who is encouraging her students to read every day.) (And to Kathleen’s students, who are reading up a storm.)

This gives me an idea. It’s time that the students know the name of the generous donor who contributed their Kindle. That way, if they want to write a thank-you card, they can thank the donor directly. Once the student writes the note, I would fill out the envelope with the donor’s address and mail off the note.

Thoughts? favicon